Fearless Summer Update

Fearless Summer is off to a powerful start…

In December around 60- 80 people gathered in Far East Gippsland, Victoria, for a national forest skillshare. A week of practical skills, talks, films and walks, informing and training people from around the country in preparation for grassroots forest activism.

Nippon Paper continues to exploit our native forests, chipping and shipping them offshore, while driving our endangered species to the brink of extinction. We will not be silent and allow our precious forests to be lost forever. In December a spate of Fearless Summer actions brought the forest destroying machine to a grinding halt on several occasions, as operations were stopped at logging sites across East Gippsland in Victoria and at the Eden woodchip mill in NSW.

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40 conservationists held up operations at the chipmill on December 9th and then again a week latter, when two protesters climbed onto a woodchip conveyor belt and attached themselves by lock-ons to the machinery. Woodchipping was halted until the pair were removed latter in the day by Police Search and Rescue.

In a stand of old growth forest at Stony Creek, conservationists captured footage of endangered long footed potoroos in the middle of an area that is now being logged. For two days logging was halted as protesters perched atop tripods blocking the road at both access points and another person climbed 30 meters to the top of a tree in the middle of the logging zone. Check out the video:

A further action halted work on the Errinundra Plateau, with another conservationist perched on a treesit platform, attached by cables to logging machinery.

These actions not only slowed down the logging of endangered species habitat, they also brought national attention to the role of Nippon Paper in the destruction of these ancient forests. And this is only the beginning…..

 

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What’s next?

In January, Fearless Summer heads down south to Tasmania, where industrial scale logging continues to obliterate vast tracts of native forests, driven by Malaysian timber company, Ta Ann. The Tasmanian Forest Agreement signed last year not only failed to protect forests, it in fact propped up the unviable industry, entrenching forest destruction into the future. It is now more critical than ever that we provide a voice to the forests and wildlife that are being devastated by Ta Ann.

People from around the country and the world are invited to join us in Tasmania to learn about the forests, celebrate the recent World Heritage listing and stand together to defend those forests that are still falling.

Fearless Summer Tasmania will kick off on Janary 3rd-5th with a camping trip in Upper Florentine Valley. This forest was once under threat of 15 logging operations. It was successfully defended by grassroots direct action, in Tasmania’s longest ever forest blockade, Camp Floz. Come and stay with us at the site of Camp Floz and enjoy guided walks and talks through these magnificent forests.

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Three weeks of actions, events and forest monitoring projects will take place around the state. Including the Weld Echo Art Exhibition opening, in Hobart, Jan 9th. And the 2nd National Forest Skillsahre, January 12- 17th. The skillshare will feature workshops on practical action skills such as tree climbing and non-violent direct action, talks on topics such as campaign strategy and forest ecology. As well as guided walks and wildlife spotlighting.

Through out Fearless Summer volunteers can take part in monitoring Tasmania’s threatened native forests. You can learn new skills in forest surveying and contribute to this important citizen science project to document the values and threats to our forests.

If you need assistance with accommodation or transport to events, please contact us: fearlesssummeraus@gmail.com

Please download and distribute the poster below:

Fearless Summer January posterFINAL

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By nativeforests

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